Story : S Africa-Federations Ban/Tourism
File ID : 353758
Video ID : 9137961
Date : Recent
Published : May 02, 2016
Duration : 2'16
Location(s) : Johannesburg, South Africa
Type : English/Nats
Source : China Central Television (CCTV)
Restrictions : No access Chinese mainland
Pageview : 117
Summary : S Africa likely to lose revenue following ban on hosting sports
Languages :

Shotlist

Johannesburg, South Africa - Recent
1. Planes taking off from airport, taxing on apron
2. Passengers entering arrivals lobby
3. Displays showing flight information
4. Arrivals lobby
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Mike Schussler, economist:
"You might be hurting the sporting codes, and sending them a message. But you're also hurting innocent people in South Africa, because for every eight tourists we create one job, and that job might not be there now."
6. Cricket stadium
7. Hotel building
8. Hotel flag fluttering in breeze
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mmatsatsi Ramawela, CEO, Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA):
"The minister talks about this ban is going to be in place for a year. We accept that, but then we ask ourselves what happens after a year, if these codes have not come in and done anything to their transformation codes? But most importantly, what can they do within a year? So hence our concern levels actually get heightened because when we start really looking and unpacking this thing, that's really when the alarm bell goes for everybody in our sector."
10. Road traffic
11. Hotel buildings
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Mmatsatsi Ramawela, CEO, Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA) (ending with shot 13):
"We are very much dependent on the image of South Africa, so perception is everything to us. As long as people perceive that events cannot be bid for South Africa, never mind that it's a short term, like the minister has said, that has an effect, has the potential to affect our industry."
13. Passengers waiting in airport lobby
14. Road traffic
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Mike Schussler, economist (starting with shot 14):
"Tourism today is bigger than the gold mine industry, and the gold mine industry is 2, 3 percent. We're looking at tourism being about 4 percent. So the damage can be very, very big, because the potential is that tourism can go to 8, 9, 10 percent of the economy."
16. Hotel building
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Mmatsatsi Ramawela, CEO, Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA):
"We are very concerned with what the minister is saying because we worry about the implications of what the minister is saying. We are not saying something is going to happen, but we are saying we are worried about the potential, what this statement is going to say over a short to medium term and also over the long term period."
18. Road traffic
19. Pedestrians

Storyline

The decision by the South African sports minister to ban four major federations from hosting international events could dampen the country’s tourism revenue, economists and industry insiders have said.

South African Sports Minister Fikile Mbalula has recently informed the national rugby, cricket, athletics and netball federations that they cannot bid for or host any international competitions on South African soil until they meet transformation targets.

But there is an unintended consequence to the announcement, said economist Mike Schussler.

"You might be hurting the sporting codes, and sending them a message. But you're also hurting innocent people in South Africa, because for every eight tourists we create one job, and that job might not be there now," Schussler explained.

Sports tourism is a significant foreign exchange earner in South Africa. The 2010 FIFA World Cup brought over 300,000 foreign tourists to the country who spent in excess of 260 million U.S. dollars during their stay.

The nation is still recovering from its new visa regulations, which placed onerous red tape on potential tourists. The regulations caused a drop in the number of tourists wanting to visit the country.

Now the sports department may stop sports tourists from visiting, by effectively banning international events.

"The minister talks about this ban is going to be in place for a year. We accept that, but then we ask ourselves what happens after a year, if these codes have not come in and done anything to their transformation codes? But most importantly, what can they do within a year? So hence our concern levels actually get heightened because when we start really looking and unpacking this thing, that's really when the alarm bells goes for everybody in our sector," said Mmatsatsi Ramawela, CEO of the Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA).

The 2003 Cricket World Cup generated 110 million dollars in tourist spending, created 3,500 jobs and saw 20,000 foreigners visiting the country. The latest ban could bring the lucrative business to an end.

"We are very much dependent on the image of South Africa, so perception is everything to us. As long as people perceive that events cannot be bid for South Africa, never mind that it's a short term, like the minister has said, that has an effect, has the potential to affect our industry," Ramawela added.

The tourism sector is a big forex generator and its share of growth in the county's GDP has grown since the 1995 Rugby World Cup. That event generated nearly a billion U.S. dollars for the country.

"Tourism today is bigger than the gold mine industry, and the gold mine industry is 2, 3 percent. We're looking at tourism being about 4 percent. So the damage can be very, very big, because the potential is that tourism can go to 8, 9, 10 percent of the economy," said Schussler.

"We are very concerned with what the minister is saying because we worry about the implications of what the minister is saying. We are not saying something is going to happen, but we are saying we are worried about the potential, what this statement is going to say over a short to medium term and also over the long term period," Ramawela added.

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